SEVEN CIRCUMSTANCES

Original Book Reviews, Recommendations and Discussions

Still life II with pewter beer mug; Still life I with 1924 British Empire tea caddy

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Still life II with apples, cherries and pewter beer mug, by M. Bijman, 8 x 8 x 0.78 inches, 20.3 x 20.3 x 2.0 cm, acrylic on canvas, varnished, framed

Still life II with apples, cherries and pewter beer mug, by M. Bijman, canvas is 8 x 8 x 0.78 inches, 20.3 x 20.3 x 2.0 cm, acrylic on canvas, varnished, framed (Now property of M.C. le Roux, Stellenbosch, South Africa)

Still life I with pears and 1924 British Empire tea caddy, by M. Bijman, 8 x 8 x 0.78 inches, 20.3 x 20.3 x 2.0 cm, acrylic on canvas, varnished, framed

Still life I with pears and 1924 British Empire tea caddy, by M. Bijman, canvas is 8 x 8 x 0.78 inches, 20.3 x 20.3 x 2.0 cm, acrylic on canvas, varnished, framed


The pewter beer tankard in Still Life II is  from about the 1920s and part of an inheritance, the Ambrosia apples were delicious and the cherries were so black and enormous they practically dripped juice.

In the other painting, the round thingie is a small copper tea caddy from the 1924 British Empire Exhibition in London, also inherited. You take the lid off at the top  – the ridge in the middle is where the lettering is, and there is a lion embossed on the backside. It’s an interesting object, part dull and used, part shiny. It is a Lipton Tea’s souvenir. The Exhibition was opened by King George V on St George’s Day, 23 April 1924, and we know our British family went to it and brought back the caddy and other doodads. The Starkrimson pears were yummy and eaten immediately after I photographed them. (Hey, life is short, enjoy it while you can.)

The idea was – the past and the present in one image. Old objects, from our past life, contrasted with fresh, live things from our present life. It’s simply saying: that was then, this is now. The fabric drapes in the background were, pardon my language, an absolute bitch to paint, no two ways about it. I must’ve redone those areas five, six times. Awful waste of paint. But in any case, there they are. I had them framed in silver floating frames with 4.5 cm deep black recesses (a tricky job well done by Dylan of Colours Art Supplies in Coquitlam.) More about painting still lifes, and how to deal with “painter’s block, here.

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