SEVEN CIRCUMSTANCES

Book Reviews & Essays on Literature


The trolls Ūgh and Bõögâr are getting their own perfume

In the previous post I discussed Ūgh and Bõögâr, the creations of Berlin-based Icelandic artist Egill Sæbjörnsson. The two trolls are huge, ugly, temperamental, artistic, and very fond of Egill, coffee, and eating tourists. They are also smelly. At 36 metres tall, they need a lot of deodorant and perfume. In the interests of cleaning up the trolls before they stink out all the tourists whom they haven’t eaten at the Venice Biennale 2017, the trolls are getting their own perfume called Noise. Continue reading


“Moonstone” and other books, by Sjón – Prepare to have your head messed with, brilliantly

Moonstone -The Boy Who Never Was, by Sjón. Translated by Victoria Cribb. First American edition published by Farrar, Straus, Giroux, New York, 2016. Originally published as “Mánasteinn – drengurinn sem aldrei var til” by JPV/Forlagið, 2013.

Moonstone – The Boy Who Never Was, by Sjón. Translated by Victoria Cribb. First American edition published by Farrar, Straus, Giroux, New York, 2016. Originally published as Mánasteinn – drengurinn sem aldrei var til by JPV/Forlagið, 2013.

Sjón: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the Reader of Sjón. Her current mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no Reader has gone before. Apologies to the writers of Star Trek, in this, its 50th anniversary year, but this is what reading the novels of Icelandic author Sjón is like. The first American edition of Sjón’s novel Moonstone – The Boy Who Never Was, was published earlier this year. While I read it, I often wondered just how it is possible for someone to express so precisely, in such visually compelling language, such foreignness, not only to readers not from Iceland, but also probably for readers from Iceland. It is in English, capably and truthfully translated by Victoria Cribb, but at the same time it is a journey into places, minds, characters, mores  and subjects that I had never before encountered in a novel.

Continue reading


Books for Summer road trips – Stories from Iceland, Denmark and Canada’s small towns

Books for Summer road trips

This past month I travelled south into the USA, down through Washington State, into Oregon, turning around at Portland to go east to Yakima, and then back north home.  It was a long looping drive, around the coast, skirting or getting into mountain peaks and forests, puttering along big highways and small byways (when we got a bit lost), through cities like Seattle and little towns like Chumstick (there’s a name for you!) that we only saw because of the forest fires burning along other routes. It was the little towns that were most interesting – how they are defined by their economies and resources, and in turn, how the people that live there shape the town.  The politics, tastes, habits and incomes of the inhabitants were plain to see.   Continue reading